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Sensor

Sensor

The HTS-1000 sensor enables fiber optic temperature measurements up to 1000 °C. In addition to the traditional benefits of fiber optic sensors, including immunity to electromagnetic interference, better environmental stability and enhanced remote sensing as compared to traditional electronic sensors, the HTS-1000 extends these benefits to ultra-high temperature applications, ranging from turbine engine test and development to refinery process monitoring and control. Microwave environments can be accommodated with an all-glass sensor housing.

The HTS-1000 sensor is used in conjunction with fiber optic interrogators and is fully integrated with Micron Optics interrogators si155, and si255.

The HTS-1000 is based on Chiral Photonics’ chiral diffraction grating, fabricated by twisting a fiber as it is passed through a miniature heat zone to produce a distinct dip in the transmission spectrum. The spectral position of the dip in this chiral fiber changes with temperature allowing it to be used as a temperature sensor.

HTS-1000 Specifications

Temperature Range Up to at least 1000 °C
Accuracy 1%
Sensitivity 0.01 nmrC (nominal)
Drift (measured over more than 1400 hours at 900 °C) 0.0005 °C/hr, (nominal)
Probe (metal sheathing) Length 300 mm standard – Other lengths and materials available upon request
Sensor/Grating Length 15 mm – Other lengths available upon request
Sensor Placement 25 mm from probe tip – Other configurations available upon request
Connector Type FC/APC – Other connectors available upon request
Packaging See Drawing – Other configurations available upon request

HTS-1000 Schematics


Temperature testing was carried out in a computer-controlled high-temperature oven in which the temperature was also monitored by a thermocouple. Both long-term temperature stability and temperature sensitivity were tested using a fiber optic interrogator to monitor sensors as they were cycled from room temperature to 1000 °C. The characteristic spectral dip wavelength shifts to the red by approximately 1.3 nm as the temperature is raised by 100 °C. The figure below shows the wavelength of transmission dip of a chiral fiber versus temperature. The temperature was cycled five times from 700 °C to 1000 °C in the course of 24 hours, dwelling for 3 hours at these temperatures. The inset shows the temperature variations. As seen in the figure below, the HTS-1000 is capable of reliably measuring temperature up to 1000 °C with better than 1% accuracy. Drift measured over more than 1400 hours at 900 °C was 0.0005 °C/hr.